Pink Ribbon Breakfast

I don’t normally plug work that I do in my daily grind, but this one is for super-great cause. Instead of our usual advertising selves, we’re using our powers for good and completely upgrading the National Breast Cancer Foundation‘s Pink Ribbon Breakfast site. Their goal is to have 0 deaths by 2030, which is a pretty nice goal all-round.

We built the site using Zend Framework, CSS3, and a healthy dose of jQuery-inspired Javascript.

Jump over to the site and check out our relatively-quiet first phase launch while we get ready for the donation-crazy second phase. And be sure to visit the donate link if you know someone with breasts.

Simple Remote Requests with Titanium Appcelerator

Titanium Appcelerator is a pretty nifty tool. Here’s a small data manager object that looked after my external requests.

I was tinkering with Appcelerator recently, and came upon the need to build a data manager to shoot off requests in a bit of a “fire-and-forget” sort of way. I created this global object I could channel requests into. My particular server always replied with JSON, so you can tweak this for whatever data your remote server will return.

Using this object in the global scope, you can just type:

Appcelerator has sped up development in key areas tremendously, but at the cost of some flexibility and code bloat. It’s worth keeping an eye on, as each release is leaps and bounds ahead of its predecessor.

Watching your Language

Inspired somewhat by Dave Ray’s post “Say Something Nice About Every Language You’ve Used“, I’ve decided to do the same.

PHP
Fairly easy to learn, and with an improving OO model, Web development will only get better. Syntax is pretty straight forward and it’s easy to get something working relatively quickly.

Visual Basic
Very simple syntax, and a good introductory language for learning Windows programming.

C/C++
I like C (and C++) because you can do with it what you will. There’s a lot of flexibility and room to move for whatever problem you have.

Java
It has a similar syntax to C, but automatic garbage collection makes me weep tears of joy.

Javascript
One of my favourite aspects of web development is putting on my Javascript hat and adding very slick functionality to my site. Simple syntax and a lot of power for overriding default objects.

Objective-C
Very quick to learn the basic syntax, and it forces a separation of code into conceptual pieces that I agree with.

That exercise is actually enlightening. I think focussing on the strengths of a particular language allows you to leverage it for maximum effectiveness. I’m fairly sure I’ve picked up more languages than this in the past, but not with enough experience for any sort of nice opinion. Perhaps next time I’ll just bitch and moan about all the languages I’ve used.